No Longer Home

No Longer Home

No Longer Home

You have your first taste of freedom, you meet new people and make baby steps into adulthood. What happens if those baby steps feel more like diving into a deep pool and unable to swim? The feeling of feeling overwhelmed, lost, and desperate is not unusual among the 20-somethings in the world. Humble Grove’s minimalist adventure No Longer Home lets us peek into the lives and times of two people who are caught in the middle of all that chaos.

No Longer Home

No Longer Home

No Longer Home

There’s No Home provides a slice of life look into the world of Ao (and Bo) and Bo (both main characters). Both are recent graduates of art school and struggling to find work in a stressful living environment. Ao, Bo and the rest of their London roommates have been living in a flat and are struggling to see their own futures.

 

Ao is in London on an expired visa, which makes things even more difficult. This means that they will have to return to Japan. The two main characters in the game have long and detailed conversations about their struggles and make observations. The game has some simple point-and click adventure elements but the most important thing is the conversations.

 

No Longer Home

No Longer Home

No Longer Home

Ao (the main character) and Bo (the antagonist) are nonbinary. The prologue explains this well and the characters’ feelings about it. You are exposed to their identities and the struggles that come with being non-conforming. They can often be seen in small interactions like not seeing your true self in the mirror and reflecting on their upbringing and how that influences how they live.

 

Also, there are metaphysical manifestations such as strange monsters which symbolize the mental demons. It comes in to make the characters feel bad, to make them angry, and to keep them there as a constant reminder. This aspect of No More Home, although it is brief and not overtly relevant to the main plot, is executed exceedingly well.

 

No Longer Home

It would be unfair to claim that No Longer Homes is a journey through self-discovery. There is not much the cast discovers that wasn’t already evident and addressed. It feels more like the main characters are retreating into themselves for two hours, while maintaining mundane conversations with each other until the game ends.

 

The End of Home has a feeling that it is a vanity project by an art school grad, but it doesn’t have enough meat to last the short amount of time it runs. The story is almost too pretensional. It jumps between 2 characters as they complain about their housing, job hunting and the viability of an arts degree in today’s economic climate. There’s also a lot of small talk between them. It’s easy to forget about something that could spice up the story. For example, if you discover a floating ball of unknown geometric forms in your bedroom, the story is dropped.

 

No Longer Home

No Longer Home

No Longer Home

No longer homeloves their small talk so much that they invite all the tenants to play a videogame. It’s a text parsing and adventure game that avoids magic scenarios in favor of deep, meandering thoughts about the world. In this game within a gaming, the character finds a cave with an elevator. This takes them to an Art School that rents out studios as apartments. It’s a very boring and uninteresting revelation.

 

This game’s thoughts will depend on where each player is at that moment in their lives. I can see No More Home resonating with young people in their 20s, who have just finished college and feel lost in all of the bigger picture. For people older than that, such as myself, it feels like deep conversation at every level. NolongerHome can be used by anyone who has been to that place in their lives or is currently in that position.

 

No Longer Home

No Longer Home

No Longer Home

There are many parts of No Longer Home which I love. Very well is the way that this book addresses gender and mental illness. But it feels like they are just one thread in a bigger tapestry that isn’t very interesting. The majority of conversations are either very dull or attempt to appear deep and philosophical on the topic of life under capitalism. It’s like watching a videogame about housing development and its availability. While a game can sometimes feel rushed, it was actually quite enjoyable. I felt relieved to see the credits roll as I didn’t have any art students talking about moving away from London.

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